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Posts Tagged ‘Support’

When he was 40, the renowned Bohemian novelist and short story writer Franz Kafka (1883–1924), who never married and had no children, was strolling through Steglitz Park in Berlin, when he chanced upon a young girl crying her eyes out because she had lost her favorite doll. She and Kafka looked for the doll without success. Kafka told her to meet him there the next day and they would look again.

The next day, when they still had not found the doll, Kafka gave the girl a letter “written” by the doll that said, “Please do not cry. I have gone on a trip to see the world. I’m going to write to you about my adventures.”

Thus began a story that continued to the end of Kafka’s life.

When they would meet, Kafka read aloud his carefully composed letters of adventures and conversations about the beloved doll, which the girl found enchanting. Finally, Kafka read her a letter of the story that brought the doll back to Berlin, and he then gave her a doll he had purchased. “This does not look at all like my doll,” she said. Kafka handed her another letter that explained, “My trips, they have changed me.” The girl hugged the new doll and took it home with her.
A year later, Kafka died.

Many years later, the now grown-up girl found a letter tucked into an unnoticed crevice in the doll. The tiny letter, signed by Kafka, said, “Everything you love is very likely to be lost, but in the end, love will return in a different way.”

Picture Courtesy – Art by Isabel Torner

Source – https://www.facebook.com/1501979730086059/posts/3322660808017933/?d=n&substory_index=0

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This book gives hope to think mindful when anxious and depressed. It offers plenty of positive views in the form of animal illustrations encapsulated with quotes which apparently was authors coping mechanism as well. It pulls a courage to feed the right support and happy to see the authors inputs from her own experiences which could make the readers to incorporate with ease. Overall, this book is poised and certainly ‘we all can do all the things’ as highlighted in the book.

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What is it like to have a group therapy concentrating on psychological aspects and bringing the famous philosopher “Arthur Schopenhauer” thoughts for a comprehension? Well, this is the theme discussed in here with different human concerns and the fundamentals of life. The psychotherapist Julius is facing a terminal illness, then accompanies his previous patient Philip, who is currently working as a counselor and a few other people to re-examine his trivialities. If you have never been to any group therapy than you can get an experience by reading this book. The group debates, discuss and raise concerns about their issues in sessions and correlates with Schopenhauer philosophies. Personally I admire these statement on the book:-

1. Nabokov described life as a spark between two identical pools of darkness, the darkness before we were born and the darkness after we die. And how odd it is that we have so much concern about the latter and so little about the former.

2. Life is forever a torment and desire is unquenchable. What a difference there is between our beginning and our end! The former in the frenzy of desire and the ecstasy of sensual pleasures; the latter in the destruction of all the organs and the musty odor of corpses.

A Brilliant book with intellectual properties.

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