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No one is stupid, no one is clever (all perceptions are incomplete)!!!

“In a train, two children were running here and there. Sometimes they would fight with each other, and at times they would jump on top of seats.

The father, sitting nearby, was lost in his thoughts.

In between, when the children looked at him, he would put on an affectionate smile, and then the children would again get busy with their mischief and the father would keep looking at them lovingly.

The co-travelers of the train were upset by the children’s playfulness and annoyed by the father’s attitude. Since it was night time, everyone wanted to rest.

Seeing the running around of the children, a traveler could not stop himself and exclaimed to the father – “What kind of father are you? The children are behaving so naughtily, and instead of stopping them you are encouraging them with your smiles. Is it not your duty to explain to them?”

The father paused for a few moments and said, “I am just thinking how to explain it to them brother.” The man said, “my wife had gone to her maternal home. She passed away yesterday due to an accident. I am taking the children there for the final rites, and now I’m confused how to explain to them that now they will never see their mother again.”

Hearing this, everyone was stunned. Let alone saying something, nobody was even able to think straight.

The children were still engaged in their mischief. They were still running around in the compartment. There was no change in the atmosphere, but those children were no longer looking like undisciplined kids to the co-passengers but were looking like soft young flowers, on which everyone wanted to pour their love.

The father was no longer a careless person, but now he was seen as the father and the mother of two children, saddened by the separation of his life partner.

The change in feeling/perception/thinking leads to change in behavior.

We keep labeling people as bad/good, stupid/clever, decent/indecent without actually knowing what they are going through or the reason behind a particular behavior.

It’s okay to have an opinion and yet never give an ultimate opinion.

Source – Forwarded from Whats-app unlimited story sharing group.

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When he was 40, the renowned Bohemian novelist and short story writer Franz Kafka (1883–1924), who never married and had no children, was strolling through Steglitz Park in Berlin, when he chanced upon a young girl crying her eyes out because she had lost her favorite doll. She and Kafka looked for the doll without success. Kafka told her to meet him there the next day and they would look again.

The next day, when they still had not found the doll, Kafka gave the girl a letter “written” by the doll that said, “Please do not cry. I have gone on a trip to see the world. I’m going to write to you about my adventures.”

Thus began a story that continued to the end of Kafka’s life.

When they would meet, Kafka read aloud his carefully composed letters of adventures and conversations about the beloved doll, which the girl found enchanting. Finally, Kafka read her a letter of the story that brought the doll back to Berlin, and he then gave her a doll he had purchased. “This does not look at all like my doll,” she said. Kafka handed her another letter that explained, “My trips, they have changed me.” The girl hugged the new doll and took it home with her.
A year later, Kafka died.

Many years later, the now grown-up girl found a letter tucked into an unnoticed crevice in the doll. The tiny letter, signed by Kafka, said, “Everything you love is very likely to be lost, but in the end, love will return in a different way.”

Picture Courtesy – Art by Isabel Torner

Source – https://www.facebook.com/1501979730086059/posts/3322660808017933/?d=n&substory_index=0

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